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Feehan says criticism of GOP elector votes is “simply wrong”

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La Crosse County’s Republican Party chair is defending the move by GOP electors in Wisconsin to cast ballots for Donald Trump last December, in case Joe Biden’s victory in the state was overturned.

Bill Feehan was one of those 10 electors designated to vote for Trump, if the president had won Wisconsin’s popular vote.

The SEIU government union is asking the state elections commission to investigate the GOP’s decision to cast votes and prepare documents as an attempt at election fraud.

“At that time several cases were pending in courts,” Feehan said in a statement Monday. “Efforts by a government union to characterize our actions as illegal are simply wrong.”

Feehan also released the statement which Republicans made on the day the Electoral College met, on December 14th. It says:
“While President Trump’s campaign continues to pursue legal options for Wisconsin, Republican electors met today in accordance with statutory guidelines to preserve our role in the electoral process with the final outcome still pending in the courts.”

Background

“If President Trump had ultimately won the state of Wisconsin, Republican electors would have needed to have met on that date, time and location in order for the results to be certified.
This meeting was held at the advice of legal counsel, just in case the Trump campaign’s legal efforts resulted in the campaign’s favor.
If President Trump had ultimately won the state of Wisconsin, Republican electors would have needed to have met on that date, time and location in order for the results to be certified.
This meeting was held in accordance with precedent.
In the 1960 presidential election, it initially appeared that Richard Nixon had won by 141 votes in that state of Hawaii. The razor-thin results prompted two recounts.
While the recounts ran their course, Democrat electors met to cast their votes for John F. Kennedy in case Kennedy emerged as the winner following the recounts.
After two recounts, it was revealed that President Kennedy won the state of Hawaii. Because the Democrat electors had met, Hawaii was able to award its electoral votes to John F. Kennedy.”